Twin pregnancy week by week guide

Follow how your babies are developing. Learn about pregnancy symptoms and what to remember, when you’re pregnant with twins.

By Kate Phillipa Clark

Have a look at this ultimate twin pregnancy week by week guide. Learn how your babies are developing and what you’ll go through in the different stages of your pregnancy.

Twin pregnancy week by week


4 weeks pregnant with twins

Read about the difference between identical and fraternal twins and find out what happens when the fertilized eggs attach to the lining of your uterus. Learn about how they will develop and what the difference is between di-di, mo-di and mo-mo twins.

5 weeks pregnant with twins
Find out whether or not twins can be detected in week 5. If you’re pregnant, your body has already begun to produce the “pregnancy hormone” Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG). You may test positive if you take a pregnancy test at this point.

6 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies are developing rapidly. The sensitivity for negative side effects of alcohol, tobacco and certain types of medication is great in the days and weeks to follow.

7 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies are growing at an amazing rate. You may be experiencing pregnancy symptoms. Find out more about how they can affect you.

8 weeks pregnant with twins
If you get a scan in this week, you’ll see two miniature babies inside of you with round heads and arms and legs.

9 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies important organs are formed and developing rapidly. You’ve probably started to gain weight.

10 weeks pregnant with twins
You might feel that your stomach isn’t working right. This is partly due to hormones and partly due to your growing uterus putting pressure on the bowels. Find out what you can do to feel better.

11 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies faces take more shape, with eyes, ears, noses and mouths. No guarantees, but many women experience that nausea subsides around this week.

12 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies are nearly fully developed. In many countries you’ll be advised to have a dating scan around this time. Find out what the sonographer will look for during the scan.

13 weeks pregnant with twins
You’re now in the second trimester of your pregnancy. Your hormone levels are evening out as your placenta(s) becomes fully operational and starts to create the required progesterone.

14 weeks pregnant with twins
Your children’s hands can grasp at this point and their legs kick, but you won’t feel it yet. Many women experience the first signs of life between week 16 and week 22.

15 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies skin are covered by the so-called lanugo hair. Your children will shed all or most of it before you give birth to them, if you don’t give birth very prematurely.

16 weeks pregnant with twins
You’ll experience life soon. It should happen anytime between week 16 and week 22. It depends very much on the position of your placenta(s) and whether it’s your first time being pregnant.

17 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies are at times very active. They can do somersaults – both forwards and backwards. Your uterus is growing continuously as your babies grow. Other people can most likely tell that you’re pregnant by now.

18 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies sebaceous glands are starting to produce sebum – oil on the skin. Together with cells, that have sloughed off your babies skin, and shed lanugo hair, this becomes vernix. Find out how the vernix protects your babies.

19 weeks pregnant with twins
You should be offered an anomaly scan, when you’re between 18 weeks and 20 weeks plus six days pregnant. Find out what the sonographer will look for and remember to let him or her know whether or not you’d like to know the sex of your babies.

20 weeks pregnant with twins
You’re in the second half of your pregnancy. You might begin to notice that your navel is “turning inside out,” because your uterus has grown bigger.

21 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies kidneys and urinary tracts are working. Your uterus takes up quite a lot of space in your stomach and acid reflux and heartburn might bother you. Find out how to cope.

22 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies are listening inside your womb. They’re mainly able to hear sounds from your body and voice at this point, but sounds from the outside world also get through.

23 weeks pregnant with twins
You may feel Braxton Hicks contractions. Your uterus will contract and feel tight or hard. Learn about the difference between Braxton Hicks contractions and labour contractions.

24 weeks pregnant with twins
You may notice swelling throughout your body during pregnancy. Find out why and how to remedy it.

25 weeks pregnant with twins
Your children’s internal organs – except the lungs – are fully developed and can function outside the womb. The progress of medical care in recent years means that your babies have better chances of survival than ever before, if you give birth in this week.

26 weeks pregnant with twins
Women carrying twins often begin their maternity leave or go on sick leave around 26 weeks. Talk to your doctor or midwife about this and find out what they recommend.

27 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies might not be as long or weigh as much as singleton babies at this point. It’s normal that twins weigh less than average and in general are smaller, when they’re born.

28 weeks pregnant with twins
We still don’t fully comprehend how babies experience life in a mother’s womb. Nevertheless, scientists have discovered that babies are far more developed, when they’re born, than previously thought. Read about what we know and how you might be able to communicate with your children.

29 weeks pregnant with twins
You’re now in the third trimester of your pregnancy. By now, you should be able to feel your babies move every day. Read about how to react if you don’t or if you experience that one or both of your babies are less active than usual.

30 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies lungs are almost mature. Your babies are practicing breathing. You may have very vivid dreams at this point in your pregnancy.

31 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies can distinguish light from dark, feel, hear and taste, what you’re tasting. You may feel that there’s not enough room in your abdomen.

32 weeks pregnant with twins
Your children are often in a sought of “dozed-off” state between sleeping and being awake. There’s brain activity, both when the babies sleep and are awake.

33 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies are practicing nursing inside your womb. They’re sucking on their fingers and toes. The space in your womb is tight by now.

34 weeks pregnant with twins
The main thing your babies need to focus on is growing and gaining weight. Premature labour is highly likely in a twin pregnancy, so your doctor and midwife will monitor you closely. Read about what they’ll pay attention to and early signs that you’re going into labour.

35 weeks pregnant with twins
If you give birth in this week, your babies may not need any medical treatment. They may be able to go straight to the maternity ward with you.

36 weeks pregnant with twins
Most babies born in this week have mature lungs. This means that your babies won’t need special help breathing if they’re born now.

37 weeks pregnant with twins
You may be fed up with being pregnant. You want to meet your babies now. You’re uncomfortable and your body is tired and hurting from carrying two children. Hold on – next week is the official date for when your pregnancy is considered at term.

38 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies are considered born at term, if you give birth in this week.

39 weeks pregnant with twins
Your children’s bones are still soft. This is good as it helps the babies through the narrow birth canal.

40 weeks pregnant with twins
Your babies will most likely be born this week. Your doctors have probably insisted for weeks that you get an induction or c-section. Find out why.


We hope you found our twin pregnancy week by week guide useful. If you want to read more pregnancy related articles, visit our pregnancy section.  

 

About the Author

Kate Phillipa Clark

Kate Phillipa Clark has a bachelor in Journalism and an Executive Master in Corporate Communication. She is an identical twin and so is her father.

 

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